iPhone 5 Explosion Causes Damage to Woman’s Eye

She said phone became uncomfortably hot after 40-minute call

Image

A Chinese woman from Dalian named Li was left with a severely scratched cornea after her iPhone 5 overheated then exploded before she could end the call.  The explosion happened after she took a 40-minute call from a friend and then tried to hang up.  But the phone failed to respond when she tried to hit ‘end call’ and instead exploded, causing damage to the woman’s eye.

Li, who cannot open her inflamed and injured eye, told the Dalian Evening News that she had only had the iPhone since September.  She said that it had been dropped once before, causing a small dent in the top right hand corner of the screen, which is also the same point where the phone exploded.

Li went on that she noticed that the phone had grown uncomfortably hot against her face, so she tried to hang up.  But in doing so doing, she found the touchscreen would not respond.  That was when it exploded, causing shrapnel-like particles to fly through the air, one of which hit Li in the eye, scratching her cornea.

This horrific occurrence is reminiscent of previous incidents with mobile phones, when a man from Hong Kong had purchased a Samsung Galaxy S4, which exploded, eventually causing his whole apartment to burn down.  Further investigations into the incident sought to establish whether the owner of the phone had been using any third-party chargers, which has become a common occurrence.  Where Apple is concerned, this is also something that the company is taking great pains to get across to its customers.

Ma Allun, a pretty 23-year old flight attendant, who previously worked with China Southern Airlines, tragically suffered a fatal electrocution when she answered her iPhone while it was still being charged.  Her brother said that her iPhone and its accessories had been passed on to investigative authorities.  Her sister also posted a message on the Chinese micro-blogging network site, Weibo, “I want to warn everyone else not to make phone calls when your mobile phone is recharging,” the Daily Mail reported.  The sad and shocking part of all this is that Ma was said to have bought her iPhone from an official Apple store in the province of Xinjiang and had been using the genuine charger that came with the iPhone at the time the tragedy struck.  Apple released a statement saying, “We are deeply saddened to learn of this tragic incident and offer our condolences to the family… We will fully investigate and co-operate with authorities in this matter.”

But an ever-growing problem is continuously emerging.  One cannot often knowingly ascertain as to whether they have purchased a genuine or cloned Apple product, unless they are proactive in their research for the tell-tell signs, when drawing comparisons to real and fake Apple products, so popular and in demand are their products in China, second only to the US.  Merchants in China are now known to reproduce many high quality looking copy-cat Apple products, from laptops, to iPads and iPods and the skill involved makes it more and more difficult to differentiate between the fake and genuine article.

It was reported in the Daily Mail that in the Chinese city of Kumming alone, 22 counterfeit Apple stores were discovered in 2011.

It is still unclear as to whether Li’s phone was charged with one of these third-party chargers, but Apple’s after-sales service, after speaking with the Dalian Evening News, are now said to be conducting further investigations into the matter.  Apple is also reported to have said that iPhone 5’s warranty does not tend to cover explosions, so Li cannot expect any compensation.  However, if Li were found not to be using a third-party charger, this would be an extremely bad PR move on Apple’s part.  As I write, my eye is constantly wandering over to my iPhone to look for any small dents…

Source 1

Source 2

More of Brucella Newman’s articles can be found on the Guardian Express website at:

http://guardianlv.com/?x=-769&y=-115&s=Brucella+Newman

Advertisements

BlackBerry For Sale: Too Little Too Late?

The smartphone’s poor reception

Image

BlackBerry, one of the world’s most prominent pioneering companies in the smartphone market, once bigger than the Apple iPhone, might be up for sale.  The declining Canadian company reported on Monday that it was seeking other potential joint partnerships in an attempt to enhance sales of its comeback device, the BlackBerry Z10.  But is it a case of too little, too late?  Is it really going to be enough for BlackBerry just to match other touch screen devices in the market?

A special board committee has been formed to consider the company’s value and options with the view to a sale.  “Given the importance and strength of our technology and the evolving industry and competitive landscape, we believe that now is the right time to explore strategic alternatives,” said board member and the committee’s serving chairman Timothy Dattels in a statement.  BlackBerry’s current president and chief executive Thorsten Heins, who joined the company in 2007, suggested that for BlackBerry, this would mark a new beginning.  Others are yet to be convinced.

BlackBerry is clearly seen to be lagging behind other thriving companies in the market, such as Apple’s iPhone, with Samsung, HTC and Google riding on its success.  The question that seems to be on most people’s lips is whether the sale will be public or private.

Edward Jones analyst Bill Kreher suggests that BlackBerry’s best bet would be to go private.  “We don’t see a strategic buyer but perhaps a private equity company that could take some time to turn around the business without the scrutiny of Wall Street,” he said.

BlackBerry once controlled the North American smartphone market in 2009 by 51%, according to research firm Gartner.  It happens to carry some valuable assets that could still be of interest to potential buyers, such as Samsung or HTC, since they do not appear to develop their own operating system, like BlackBerry does.  However, the ownership and development of an operating system does not a King of Mobiles make and this bargaining chip as bait has yet to be bitten.

Whilst BlackBerry was being flat-footed and still pandering to the business world by creating devices that took far too long, in this rapidly progressive world of technology, to carry multiple cameras, other companies were following the zeitgeist and giving the public what it wanted – touch screen technology and a broad spectrum of compatible apps.  With the development of multi-device compatible software applications such as What’s App and particularly Viber, which enabled callers to talk to friends, family and colleagues for free – a much welcomed application during the current financial climate – BlackBerry dragged its feet, trying to remain exclusive with BBM for too long, forcing consumers to either stick to texting on a tiny screen with tiny buttons or break free and explore other avenues.  BB’s efforts to claw its way back up the ladder with its launch of the Z10 range, in an already touchscreen-saturated arena that had raised the bar above what BB was capable of, or willing to meet, was a case of “too little, too late,” a sentiment also echoed by Gartner analyst Carolina Milanesi.  She said, “By the time it arrived, people had already made the decision to move on, based on the consumer side and enterprise side.”  BB’s lack of foresight and slow response to iPhone and Android devices resulted in its percentage of the market dropping last year to a very disappointing 2%.  The current percentage held by the company stands at 3.4%.

Roger Entner, founder of Recon Analytics was doubtful that going private would do anything to help BlackBerry at this late stage.  “I don’t think them going private will help at all, and I think exploring strategic options like selling themselves is a little bit late,” he said.

The days of riding the crest alongside other major players in the game are gone and so it seems, is Mike Lazaridis, BlackBerry’s co-founder, formerly its co-chief and co-chairman and also predecessor to Mr Heins, who once upon a time promised us a new beginning.

By Brucella Newman

Source 1 

Source 2 

 

More of Brucella Newman’s articles can be found on the Guardian Express website at:

http://guardianlv.com/?x=-769&y=-115&s=Brucella+Newman